Dating ball ideal jars updating tables in a database

Posted by / 24-Aug-2020 13:01

They all have glass lids, the half pint says Ball Ideal, # 5 on bottom, 2nd jar from left says Ball Sure Seal, # 2 on bottom, third jar from left says Ball Ideal with pat. fourth jar from left is a slightly different color, says Ball Ideal, with pat. Robert Barqs19 Here are the other jars, left to right is a half gallon screw top Ball Mason, #5 on bottom. Ball Ideal with pat date of July 14, 1908 on front, # 9 on bottom. "Atlas E-Z Seal" bottom says Atlas E-Z Seal Trade Mark Reg. One of the problems with trying to determine value to your jars is that fact that there are so many different variants to the Ball jars. Without having the jar in hand it is hard to ascertain which variant you have.Second from left is a glass top Ball Ideal half gallon with Pat. The half pint jar Ball Ideal seems to be the most valuable with a listing of -100, if it is the same variant which is listed in the Red Book #9.) One great example is the ultra-rare upside-down Ball Mason jar.This glassware piece was only issued from 1900 to 1910. Some folks who enjoy hearing about happy mistakes might be tickled by the fact that an old Mason jar once considered an "error" is among these valuable items today.Mason wasn’t the only manufacturer to add this patent date to his jars, hence its vast proliferation.John Mason invented and patented the process for cutting a thread onto the lip of glass jars, as well as a corresponding thread inside zinc lids, which could then be screwed tightly onto the jars.The infamous violet Columbia Mason jar developed a purple tint when it was exposed to the sun, which was a result of manganese added to the glass.But people were such fans of the lovely color that manufacturers actually began selling it in that shade — purposefully — in 1905.

The Mason's Patent jar is probably in the range, made before about 1900 if it has a ground lip, after 1900 with smooth lip. Jarsnstuff very correct in that you have a nice starter collection! It looks just like it but I'm kind of confused, but shouldn't the glass top jars have come first? Now, as for "whittle", it is believed that the first jars blown on any given day were blown into cold molds.Hi Robert, I'd be a little more conservative on the half-pint Ball Ideal at -, they're not in quite as much demand as the blue Ball Perfect Mason half-pints. (and one very recently found at a favorite childhood fishing spot of mine. But as for the other jars at this same site, I'd say they are a little bit pricey (imo). Jars with the 1858 embossing were made from the late 1860's until about WWI.I like your green Ball Ideal at about , with the blue Atlas, Ideal & Sure Seal at

The Mason's Patent jar is probably in the $5 range, made before about 1900 if it has a ground lip, after 1900 with smooth lip. Jarsnstuff very correct in that you have a nice starter collection! It looks just like it but I'm kind of confused, but shouldn't the glass top jars have come first? Now, as for "whittle", it is believed that the first jars blown on any given day were blown into cold molds.

Hi Robert, I'd be a little more conservative on the half-pint Ball Ideal at $50-$75, they're not in quite as much demand as the blue Ball Perfect Mason half-pints. (and one very recently found at a favorite childhood fishing spot of mine. But as for the other jars at this same site, I'd say they are a little bit pricey (imo). Jars with the 1858 embossing were made from the late 1860's until about WWI.

I like your green Ball Ideal at about $10, with the blue Atlas, Ideal & Sure Seal at $1-$3 each. I have to wonder if maybe i didn't use it as a worm jar, from my parents collection and accidently left it there 40 years ago.) Ball Mason's do come in assorted flavors (sizes, shapes, age,price) and the information you have got so far here (from Woody & Jarsnstuff) is very correct. (If not, then I gave my globes away.) You can certainly find out very much facinating information on Ball Mason's, such as history and dating them, by doing a Google search. Also the lid has a Iron Cross on it with the letters FHJ Co. The "Lightning" style jars were first made in the 1880's. Most collectors like to put those lids on jars marked with the HFJ Co.

These were acquired from my grandmother who collected back in the forties.

I do not know what these are worth are the size of each jar. Ok well my dad came in and said that the smallest one was a half pint and the other three are pints.

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The Mason's Patent jar is probably in the $5 range, made before about 1900 if it has a ground lip, after 1900 with smooth lip. Jarsnstuff very correct in that you have a nice starter collection! It looks just like it but I'm kind of confused, but shouldn't the glass top jars have come first? Now, as for "whittle", it is believed that the first jars blown on any given day were blown into cold molds.Hi Robert, I'd be a little more conservative on the half-pint Ball Ideal at $50-$75, they're not in quite as much demand as the blue Ball Perfect Mason half-pints. (and one very recently found at a favorite childhood fishing spot of mine. But as for the other jars at this same site, I'd say they are a little bit pricey (imo). Jars with the 1858 embossing were made from the late 1860's until about WWI.I like your green Ball Ideal at about $10, with the blue Atlas, Ideal & Sure Seal at $1-$3 each. I have to wonder if maybe i didn't use it as a worm jar, from my parents collection and accidently left it there 40 years ago.) Ball Mason's do come in assorted flavors (sizes, shapes, age,price) and the information you have got so far here (from Woody & Jarsnstuff) is very correct. (If not, then I gave my globes away.) You can certainly find out very much facinating information on Ball Mason's, such as history and dating them, by doing a Google search. Also the lid has a Iron Cross on it with the letters FHJ Co. The "Lightning" style jars were first made in the 1880's. Most collectors like to put those lids on jars marked with the HFJ Co.These were acquired from my grandmother who collected back in the forties.I do not know what these are worth are the size of each jar. Ok well my dad came in and said that the smallest one was a half pint and the other three are pints.

- each. I have to wonder if maybe i didn't use it as a worm jar, from my parents collection and accidently left it there 40 years ago.) Ball Mason's do come in assorted flavors (sizes, shapes, age,price) and the information you have got so far here (from Woody & Jarsnstuff) is very correct. (If not, then I gave my globes away.) You can certainly find out very much facinating information on Ball Mason's, such as history and dating them, by doing a Google search. Also the lid has a Iron Cross on it with the letters FHJ Co. The "Lightning" style jars were first made in the 1880's. Most collectors like to put those lids on jars marked with the HFJ Co.These were acquired from my grandmother who collected back in the forties.I do not know what these are worth are the size of each jar. Ok well my dad came in and said that the smallest one was a half pint and the other three are pints.

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It’s likely that “White Lightning” derived its name from the fact that bootleggers used these jars to store their product.